Documentary Afternoon

Join us at the Rio Cinema for an afternoon of mid-length documentaries from London filmmakers, with a truly international reach. EEFF alumni The Rainbow Collective introduce us to two boys who make their living on a railway platform in Bangladesh; Lainey Richardson explores the ravaging effects of drug addiction on the townships of South Africa; Eelyn Lee follows four performers getting ready to participate in the spectacular Paralymic Games Opening Night Ceremony Santiago Posada travels with an ex-alcoholic across Sri Lanka towards an uncertain reconciliation with his family; and Eva Weber’s Black Out shows students in Guinea going to extraordinary lengths to better themselves. This is British filmmaking at its most outward looking and illuminating.

All Eyes On Us – 1.30pm
UK | Eelyn Lee | 26 min

Black Out – 2.20pm 
UK | Eva Weber | 47 min

Platform 12 – 3.20pm
UK | The Rainbow Collective | 9 min

Railway Redemption – 3.50pm
UK, Sri Lanka | Santiago Posada | 35 min

Tik and the Turkey – 4.35pm
UK | Lainey Richardson | 52 min

BURN: Moving Images by Cabaret Artists

Following a sold-out April event, BURN returns to the Hackney Attic as part of the East End Film Festival. Expect another hot-mess jukebox of work made for the camera by the cream of east London’s underground cabaret and alternative performance scenes, from comedy and music to documentaries and experimental work. This event includes ‘Vinegar to Jam’, a short documentary by Edward Lawrenson and BURN creator Ben Walters about the final performances of Jonny Woo and the LipSinkers at the seminal Bistrotheque cabaret room in Bethnal Green, accompanied by live performance by the LipSinkers’ Blanche Dubois.

About BURN:
For artists perennially working on a shoestring, the advent of cheap DV has opened up new dimensions of the imagination. From music videos to gorgeously photographed art films, high-concept gags to experiments in light, video-interactive live work to low-budget features, the moving image is being embraced by the underground as never before.

BURN is a place for these sparks to combust.

Since debuting at Bistrotheque in Bethnal Green with three sold-out events (including a screening of Uncle David with David Hoyle), BURN has been part of the London Lesbian & Gay Film Festival at BFI Southbank, Mother’s Ruin at Manchester’s Contact theatre, the Hot August Fringe at the Royal Vauxhall Tavern and Mimetic at the Dugdale Centre, Enfield, and held events at the Hackney Attic and Bethnal Green Working Men’s Club. More details at http://BURNlondon.com

 £5.00. Tickets available from the Hackney Picturehouse website here

Zoom Films

Welcome to the ZOOM screening at the 2013 East End Film Festival. In 2008 The British Sign Language Broadcasting Trust (BSLBT) was set up to commission short films and television programmes made by Deaf people for Deaf people in British Sign Language (BSL). In 2009 BSLBT and Neath Films launched the ZOOM scheme to help younger, emerging Deaf filmmakers produce their first or second low budget short programme for TV broadcast on Film4 and the Community Channel.

The remit of the scheme was simple: if you are a new Deaf filmmaker,  you can apply for ZOOM and make a film of approx. 9-12 mins, and if you are more experienced you can make a film of 24mins under the ZOOM FOCUS banner. A total of 20 short films have been produced by 14 different directors since 2010 and many of the films have gone to have a healthy festival life winning numerous awards around the world.

To see more BSL films, and more from ZOOM, please visit BSLBT’s website. www.bslzone.co.uk, or for more information email zoom@neathfilms.com

The End | 24 min
Starting in the 1980s, The End follows 4 deaf children over 60 years. After the introduction of a treatment aimed at eradicating deafness, the very survival of Deaf language and culture is at stake. Featuring an ensemble cast, The End is a thought-provoking alternative vision of the future.

You, Me| 24 min
A charming family drama set during Christmas, telling 2 intercutting stories at both ends of the age range as a little girl learns that Santa might not be Deaf, and an old teacher must find a new calling after his Deaf school is closed due to budget cuts.

Confession | 24 min
Set in the aftermath of the Milan Conference, which promoted oralism over Sign language, Confession is a historical drama set during the Victorian era depicting the culture battle between oralism and Signing in the deaf community. Featuring the real historical figures of Alexander Graham Bell and Reverend Francis Maginn as they battle for the future of Deaf culture, the film depicts the true consequences of the Milan conference held 10 years previously.

Strangers | 24 min
Strangers is about a Deaf teenager in a hearing family, where communication is not clear. An interpreter arrives on her own because the social worker is held up, and suddenly the son has a voice with which to express himself, much to the astonishment of his parents.

Little World | 8 min
In this animated short set in the Victorian era, Little World tells the story of a young Deaf woman called Beth. Now an adult, she visits the crumbling old Deaf school where she grew up, and remembers fondly how it shaped her.

September 11 | 1.30 min
September 11 is a personal account of the effects of September 11, 2001 on a young Deaf Muslim teenager, who faces racism from both inside and outside the Deaf community, making her question her faith.

£8.00 Tickets will be available from the Genesis Cinema here

Tik and the Turkey

The townships in the suburbs of Cape Town, SA are blighted by the highly addictive, heroin-based ‘unga,’ which is mixed with cleaning detergents; and the Crystal Meth known locally as ‘tik.’ Slowly crippling the population, Lainey Richardson’s debut documentary follows 27 year old, party girl addict Analese, and her 25 year old childhood friend Trevino, who is struggling to hold his family together, having lied about his heroin addiction until he was married. The Tik and the Turkey is the human face of an abandoned community facing a drug abuse epidemic.

Tik and the Turkey screens as part of the EEFF’s Documentary Afternoon on Sunday 30 June.

£10 Tickets will be available from the Rio Cinema website here.

Best Documentary Feature Competition 

 

The Man Whose Mind Exploded

Exploring the wonderful past, and extraordinary present, of Drako Oho Zahar Zahar, The Man Whose Mind Exploded is Toby Amies’ deeply personal account of his relationship with a man who once posed for Salvador Dali and Andy Warhol, but can no longer make new memories. Living in a Brighton flat which is an extraordinary floor-to-ceiling collage of relics from his old life, the tattooed and frequently naked Drako reminds himself of what is happening day to day with written notes, and Toby struggles to keep him safe. A tender portrait of an extraordinary individual, and a touching friendship.

£9.50 Tickets available from the Rich Mix Cinema website here.

Best Documentary Feature Competition 

 

Television

Set in Mithanupur, local leader, Amin, wages a personal war against all kinds of images. In Television, Mastofa Sarwar Farooki’s take on the clash between religion and technology in a Bangladeshi village, parable becomes powerful satire. When Kumar, the local teacher, buys a television that entices inhabitants of the village to his house, Amin declares war, starting a conflict that eventually takes on hilarious proportions. A state of the nation film from Bangladesh’s most vital, challenging filmmaker. 

£9.50 Tickets available from the Rich Mix Cinema website here. 

Railway Redemption

East London-based filmmaker Santiago Posada travels to Sri Lanka, and unearths a story with unusual resonance as a seventy year-old busker makes a final journey home. Hearing that his brother is dying, Vijay decides to face up to his past and confront his family, with whom he has had no contact for twenty-five years due to his alcoholism and death of his mother. Taking stylistic direction from its subject’s personality, the result is a moving, dignified portrait of belonging and troubled pasts.

Railway Redemption screens as part of the EEFF’s Documentary Afternoon on Sunday 30 June.

£10.00 Tickets will be available from the Rio Cinema website here.

Best Documentary Feature Competition 

Platform 12

A visceral and moving short documentary which captures a moment in the lives of Raqib and Mala, two young children living and working in Bangladesh’s central train station. Shot entirely from a child’s point of view, the film follows the friends as one more train enters the station, bringing with it the promise of work and survival for another day.

Platform 12 screens as part of the EEFF’s Documentary Afternoon on Sunday 30 June. £10.00 Tickets will be available from the Rio Cinema website here.

Best Documentary Feature Competition 

Family Ties

Love them or hate them, you can’t deny your family.

Touching on the universal yet varied relationships that exist between mothers and daughters, husbands and wives, fathers and sons and sibling to sibling. This programme of live action, animation and documentary reveals poignant, surreal and dark explorations to what happens when these eternal bonds are tested. 

Programmed by Kirsten Geekie

 

Long Distance Information

UK | Douglas Hart | 8 min

From Dad to Son

Germany | Nils Knoblich | 5 min

Laura

UK | Tim Knights | 20 min

Cowboys

UK | James Alexandrou| 18 min

Kingdom of Doug

Australia | Victoria Thaine | 15 min

Driftwood

UK | James Webber | 11 min

Mickey & Michaela Bury Their Dad

UK | Tom George | 8 min

£10.00 Tickets available from the Hackney Picturehouse website here.

Black Out

With only a fifth of Guinea’s 10 million people having sporadic access to electricity, scores of young people, aspiring to a more prosperous life than their parents’, are forced to roam the streets at night in search of light by which to study. Black Out is a poetic tale of young people frequenting gas stations, parks in the rich part of town, and the airport; often walking for miles in the middle of the night, thumbing books and reciting lessons to themselves. A touching film that is both heartbreaking and hopeful.

Black Out screens as part of the EEFF’s Documentary Afternoon on Sunday 30 June. Tickets will be available from the Rio Cinema website here.