Norfolk

Distinctive, risk-taking British filmmaking, Martin Radich’s third feature is a visual and aural treat with a genre twist. Ostensibly a story of father and son involved in political terrorism, Norfolk uses its bucolic setting as a backdrop for revenge, familial breakdown and elemental violence. A disturbed mercenary known only as Man (Denis Ménochet) prepares for one final mission, only for his plans to be disrupted when his son falls for the girl living with the foreign revolutionaries he is targeting. This strange, often hallucinatory experience blends rural isolation, analogue technology, Rambo and the heavy weight of past tragedy on the present.

Followed by a Q&A. Tickets available from the Genesis Cinema website here.

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Fire, The (El Incendio)

Lucía and Marcelo are taking $100,000 in cash to an estate agent, intending to buy their first home. But something goes wrong and the sale is postponed. So begins Juan Schnitman’s unbearably tense chamber piece of relationship breakdown, chronicling the spectacular implosion of a romantic bond over the course of 24 hours. Superbly acted, and evocative of how love, resentment and insecurity can sit side by side, The Fire is an incendiary portrait of two people unable to treat this as “just another day”.ArgentinaArgentina

Followed by a Q&A. Tickets available from the Hackney Picturehouse website here.
Screening supported by the Embassy of Argentina in London.

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Ivy

A group of disgruntled sailors go off the deep end in the extraordinary second feature from director Tolga Karaçelik (Tollbooth). Set on board a hulking cargo ship moored off the coast of Egypt, Ivy follows a skeleton crew of seabound misfits, including a narky Cypriot captain, his religiously devout number two, two dishevelled dossers, and the cliff-like, monosyllabic ‘Kurd’. Forced to stay onboard after their paymasters go bust, it isn’t long before power structures are dissolving, leading to tension, factionalism, threats of violence, and strange apparitions. Shot by Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s DOP Gökhan Tiryaki, this is a brilliantly atmospheric parable of cabin fever.

Followed by Q&A. Tickets available from the Rio Cinema website here.

Please note that this film is now screening on Saturday 11 July, not Sunday 12 July as originally advertised. 

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Manos Sucias

Executive producer Spike Lee takes us up river with a torpedo full of cocaine in Manos Sucias (Dirty Hands), the taut feature debut from Josef Kubota Wladyka. Three men accept a job from gangsters in Colombia’s dangerous port city Buenaventura, then journey through the murky waters of the Pacific posing as fishermen, guided by a mysterious set of coordinates. In order to get ahead they risk conflict with locals, the narco-police and their fellow traffickers, in this unbearably tense account of life at the bottom of the food chain in the international drug trade.

Tickets available from the Hackney Picturehouse website here.
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Pleasure Island

Part thriller, part western, part portrait of faded seaside glamour, Pleasure Island is a tightly sketched character drama set on a crumbling stretch of coastline. Dean returns to Grimsby after several years away in the army. Greeted by most with either confusion or hostility, he is back purely to reconnect with Jess, a childhood friend struggling to raise a daughter on her own.

Followed by a Q&A. Tickets available from the Hackney Picturehouse website here.

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Atlantic

Atlantic tells the story of Fettah’s search for discovery and renewal during one fateful summer, as tourists from Europe and the US flock to Fettah’s village to ride the perfect waves and enjoy the tranquil local vibe. When a repeat visitor arrives with a beautiful new companion (Thekla Reuten), Fettah senses an undeniable connection between himself and the stunning stranger — she’s a woman he cannot help but long for. When she leaves, Fettah is compelled to undertake a quixotic solo voyage from Morocco to Europe over 300 kilometres of ocean, with only his sail and surfboard to carry him. What awaits him on that distant shore is uncertain, but he is determined to follow the dictates of his heart.Netherlands

Followed by a Q&A. Screening supported by the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in London. Tickets available from the Hackney Picturehouse website here.

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Crumbs

The story is set against the background of spectacular post-apocalyptic Ethiopian landscapes, where our diminutive superhero Gagano – on the one hand gripped by daydreams and on the other by constant fears – has had enough of collecting the valuable crumbs of decayed civilisation, the valuable high points of which are merchandise from Michael Jackson and Michael Jordan. When a spaceship that has been hovering high in the sky for years starts showing signs of activity, Gagano has to overcome his fears – but also a witch, Santa Claus and second-generation Nazis – to find out that things aren’t quite the way he thought.

Followed by a Q&A. Tickets available from the Hackney Picturehouse website here.

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Life in a Fishbowl

Baldvin Zophoniasson’s second feature is a gripping tale of getting by in post-2008 Iceland. The film follows three very different characters offering a cross section of society after the financial crash. A kind-hearted single mother takes on a demeaning career to stay afloat and protect her child; a dishevelled drifter drinks in order to forget his past; and an ambitious businessman wrestles with his conscience in the face of corporate fraud. As they each consider how to help themselves and the people around them, what emerges is an Amores Perros for the austerity generation, woven into a wildly emotional drama.

Tickets available from the Hackney Picturehouse website here.
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Line of Credit (Kreditis Limiti)

Line of Credit is an ironic, bleakly comic drama about sliding down the economic scales in post-Soviet Georgia. Nino, a fortysomething woman from a well-off family, is finding it hard to make ends meet while keeping up appearances. Selling off the family jewels to keep creditors at bay, she’s constantly having to find new ways of borrowing money. Shot in beautiful widescreen tableaux, with a message about the 170,000 Georgian families who have lost their homes over the past five years, this a brilliant take on shifting socialmores and fortunes in the shadow of Russia.

Tickets available from the Barbican website here.

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